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  1. Octavian as Augustus, 27 BC (1)
  2. Tiberius augustus, 14 (1)
  3. In the name of Nero Claudius Drusus, brother of Tiberius and father of Claudius (1)
  4. Nero augustus, 54 (1)
  5. Vespasian, 69 (2)
  6. Titus caesar, 69 (1)
  7. Domitian augustus, 81 (1)
  8. Domitia, wife of Domitian (1)
  9. Nerva, 96 (1)
  10. Trajan, 98 (2)
  11. Matidia, daughter of Trajan (1)
  12. Hadrian, 117 (3)
  13. Antoninus Pius, 138-161 (4)
  14. Faustina I, wife of Antoninus Pius (3)
  15. Marcus Aurelius caesar, 139 (1)
  16. Faustina II, wife of Marcus Aurelius and daughter of Antoninus Pius (1)
  17. Commodus, 177 (1)
  18. Crispina, wife of Commodus (1)
  19. Pertinax, January 1st (1)
  20. Septimius Severus, 193 (4)
  21. Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus (1)
  22. Caracalla, 198 (5)
  23. Plautilla, wife of Caracalla (1)
  24. Geta caesar, 198 (2)
  25. Elagabalus 218 (2)
  26. Severus Alexander, 222 (1)
  27. Gordian III, 238 (1)
  28. Philip II caesar, 244 (1)
  29. Trajan Decius, 249 (1)
  30. Herennia Etruscilla, wife of Trajan Decius. (1)
  31. Trebonianus Gallus, 251 (2)
  32. Volusian, 251 (1)
  33. Gallienus, 253 (3)
  34. Postumus, 260 (1)
  35. Aurelian, 270 (1)
  36. Tacitus, 275 (1)
  37. Probus, 276 (3)
  38. Carus, 282 (1)
  39. Numerian augustus, 283 (1)
  40. Carinus, 283 (1)
  41. Julian I of Pannonia, October (1)
  42. Diocletian, 284-305 (3)
  43. Maximianus augustus, first reign 286 (3)
  44. Constantius I Chlorus caesar, 293 (1)
  45. Constantius I Chlorus augustus, 305 (1)
  46. Galerius Maximianus caesar, 293 (1)
  47. Severus II caesar, 305 (1)
  48. Maximinus II Daia caesar, 305 (1)
  49. Maxentius, 307 (1)
  50. Licinius I, 308 (1)
  51. Licinius II caesar, 317 (1)
  52. Constantine I, 307 (7)
  53. Crispus caesar, 316 (1)
  54. Constantine II caesar, 316 (2)
  55. Constantius III, 8th February (1)
  56. Justa Gratia Honoria, sister of Valentinian III (1)



Numismatica Ars Classica, Zurich   |   Auction 102   |   24 October 2017 Sort by Lot-NumberSort by Estimate
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Lot 500





Estimate: 25'000 CHF   |   Starting price: 20'000 CHF Price realized: 38'000 CHF
P. Petronius Turpilianus. Aureus circa 19 BC, AV 8.02 g. TVRPILIANVS – III·VIR Ivy-wreathed head of Liber r. Rev. AVGVSTO / OB·C·S within oak wreath. Bahrfeldt 177. Babelon Petronia 1 and Julia 207. C 143. BMC 5. RIC 278. CBN 108. Calicó 143.
Extremely rare, one of very few specimens known. An intriguing issue with
an interesting portrait, minor marks, otherwise extremely fine
Ex CNG 5, 1988, 336; Stack’s 14 June 1993, 7; Triton XI, 2008, 693; Stack’s 11 January 2010, Vermuele, Ward and Mexico, 329 and Chaponnière & Hess-Divo 1, 2010, 210 sales.
As Rome’s first emperor, Augustus bridged the gap between Republic and Empire, from imperium to auctoritas. In terms of coinage, he initially retained two numismatic relics of the Republic: the collegium of moneyers and the substantial issuance of non-Imperial portrait types. This aureus, issued in about 19 B.C., retains both of these Republican qualities, for the emperor’s portrait is absent and the moneyer’s name is prominent. This aureus names P. Petronius Turpilianus, who was clearly the dominant member of Augustus’ earliest collegium of moneyers to sign coins at Rome, as about half of the more than forty issues of the collegium bear his name. Turpilianus struck aurei and denarii with obverses bearing the heads of Augustus, the Liber (Bacchus) and Feronia, a goddess worshipped by the Sabines and the Etrurians, and considered by the Greeks to be the goddess of flowers and of emancipation from slavery. The reverse type of AVGVSTO OB C S within an oak wreath harkens back to his being awarded the title Augustus by the senate in 27 B.C., and to the privilege he enjoyed of decorating his doorposts with an oak wreath and laurel branches. This was a highly important distinction to Augustus, who was never shy about promoting his various honours, for he maintained the official line that his powers were derived through his influence, authority and prestige (auctoritas).

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