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  1. Octavian as Augustus, 27 BC (1)
  2. Tiberius augustus, 14 (1)
  3. In the name of Nero Claudius Drusus, brother of Tiberius and father of Claudius (1)
  4. Nero augustus, 54 (1)
  5. Vespasian, 69 (2)
  6. Titus caesar, 69 (1)
  7. Domitian augustus, 81 (1)
  8. Domitia, wife of Domitian (1)
  9. Nerva, 96 (1)
  10. Trajan, 98 (2)
  11. Matidia, daughter of Trajan (1)
  12. Hadrian, 117 (3)
  13. Antoninus Pius, 138-161 (4)
  14. Faustina I, wife of Antoninus Pius (3)
  15. Marcus Aurelius caesar, 139 (1)
  16. Faustina II, wife of Marcus Aurelius and daughter of Antoninus Pius (1)
  17. Commodus, 177 (1)
  18. Crispina, wife of Commodus (1)
  19. Pertinax, January 1st (1)
  20. Septimius Severus, 193 (4)
  21. Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus (1)
  22. Caracalla, 198 (5)
  23. Plautilla, wife of Caracalla (1)
  24. Geta caesar, 198 (2)
  25. Elagabalus 218 (2)
  26. Severus Alexander, 222 (1)
  27. Gordian III, 238 (1)
  28. Philip II caesar, 244 (1)
  29. Trajan Decius, 249 (1)
  30. Herennia Etruscilla, wife of Trajan Decius. (1)
  31. Trebonianus Gallus, 251 (2)
  32. Volusian, 251 (1)
  33. Gallienus, 253 (3)
  34. Postumus, 260 (1)
  35. Aurelian, 270 (1)
  36. Tacitus, 275 (1)
  37. Probus, 276 (3)
  38. Carus, 282 (1)
  39. Numerian augustus, 283 (1)
  40. Carinus, 283 (1)
  41. Julian I of Pannonia, October (1)
  42. Diocletian, 284-305 (3)
  43. Maximianus augustus, first reign 286 (3)
  44. Constantius I Chlorus caesar, 293 (1)
  45. Constantius I Chlorus augustus, 305 (1)
  46. Galerius Maximianus caesar, 293 (1)
  47. Severus II caesar, 305 (1)
  48. Maximinus II Daia caesar, 305 (1)
  49. Maxentius, 307 (1)
  50. Licinius I, 308 (1)
  51. Licinius II caesar, 317 (1)
  52. Constantine I, 307 (7)
  53. Crispus caesar, 316 (1)
  54. Constantine II caesar, 316 (2)
  55. Constantius III, 8th February (1)
  56. Justa Gratia Honoria, sister of Valentinian III (1)



Numismatica Ars Classica, Zurich   |   Auction 102   |   24 October 2017 Sort by Lot-NumberSort by Estimate
Online bidding ends:  24 October 2017 10:00 CEST

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Lot 573





Estimate: 15'000 CHF   |   Starting price: 12'000 CHF
CHF  
Aureus, Ticinum 305-306, AV 4.63 g. SEVERVS – NOB CAES Laureate head r. Rev. CONCORDIA CAESS NOSTR Concordia seated l., holding patera and double cornucopiae; in exergue, SMT. C 3. RIC 49a. Depyrot 8/2. Calicó 4977 (these dies).
Very rare. A very attractive portrait, two light scratches on reverse and
flan slightly bent, otherwise extremely fine
Ex Hirsch 33, 1913, Friedrich von Schennis, 1463; Sotheby’s 9 June 1983, Virgil Brand part III, 452; NAC 54, 2010, 607 and Künker 174, 2010, 1004 sales.
Severus II certainly ranks among the least fortunate of the rulers of the Tetrarchic period. When Diocletian and Maximian abdicated their thrones in 305, their loyal Caesars, Constantius I and Galerius, assumed the vacant titles of Augustus, and in turn selected replacement Caesars. For himself Galerius chose his nephew Maximinus Daia, and for Constantius I he chose his old comrade-in-arms Severus II (though Constantius was Senior Augustus, the true power was held by Galerius, who had the ear of Diocletian). Passed over in all of this was Maxentius, son of the just-retired emperor Maximian. Incensed at the turn of events, Maxentius revolted in Rome, first declaring himself Princeps and Caesar, and soon thereafter Augustus. Since the affected areas of Italy and North Africa were in the territory of Severus II, the grim task of marching on Rome and overthrowing Maxentius landed squarely on his shoulders. It might have seemed an easy task – the rebel had a small, ill-trained army – but that was before Maxentius lured his father out of unwanted retirement. Most of the soldiers Severus II was leading had served under Maximian, and through liberal bribes and crafty politicking Maximian turned the tide against Severus II, who fled north and eventually surrendered on the condition that his life would be spared. Father and son rebels were true to their promise until Galerius himself invaded Italy to finish the job, at which point they executed Severus II, and managed to expel Galerius from Italy

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