Navigation  Pin?

Sale information
Terms of sale
Bid sheet (0)
Search this auction:

Sort-Order: Lot-Number
Sort by Lot-NumberSort by Estimate
Browse all lots (90)
  1. Octavian as Augustus, 27 BC (1)
  2. Tiberius augustus, 14 (1)
  3. In the name of Nero Claudius Drusus, brother of Tiberius and father of Claudius (1)
  4. Nero augustus, 54 (1)
  5. Vespasian, 69 (2)
  6. Titus caesar, 69 (1)
  7. Domitian augustus, 81 (1)
  8. Domitia, wife of Domitian (1)
  9. Nerva, 96 (1)
  10. Trajan, 98 (2)
  11. Matidia, daughter of Trajan (1)
  12. Hadrian, 117 (3)
  13. Antoninus Pius, 138-161 (4)
  14. Faustina I, wife of Antoninus Pius (3)
  15. Marcus Aurelius caesar, 139 (1)
  16. Faustina II, wife of Marcus Aurelius and daughter of Antoninus Pius (1)
  17. Commodus, 177 (1)
  18. Crispina, wife of Commodus (1)
  19. Pertinax, January 1st (1)
  20. Septimius Severus, 193 (4)
  21. Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus (1)
  22. Caracalla, 198 (5)
  23. Plautilla, wife of Caracalla (1)
  24. Geta caesar, 198 (2)
  25. Elagabalus 218 (2)
  26. Severus Alexander, 222 (1)
  27. Gordian III, 238 (1)
  28. Philip II caesar, 244 (1)
  29. Trajan Decius, 249 (1)
  30. Herennia Etruscilla, wife of Trajan Decius. (1)
  31. Trebonianus Gallus, 251 (2)
  32. Volusian, 251 (1)
  33. Gallienus, 253 (3)
  34. Postumus, 260 (1)
  35. Aurelian, 270 (1)
  36. Tacitus, 275 (1)
  37. Probus, 276 (3)
  38. Carus, 282 (1)
  39. Numerian augustus, 283 (1)
  40. Carinus, 283 (1)
  41. Julian I of Pannonia, October (1)
  42. Diocletian, 284-305 (3)
  43. Maximianus augustus, first reign 286 (3)
  44. Constantius I Chlorus caesar, 293 (1)
  45. Constantius I Chlorus augustus, 305 (1)
  46. Galerius Maximianus caesar, 293 (1)
  47. Severus II caesar, 305 (1)
  48. Maximinus II Daia caesar, 305 (1)
  49. Maxentius, 307 (1)
  50. Licinius I, 308 (1)
  51. Licinius II caesar, 317 (1)
  52. Constantine I, 307 (7)
  53. Crispus caesar, 316 (1)
  54. Constantine II caesar, 316 (2)
  55. Constantius III, 8th February (1)
  56. Justa Gratia Honoria, sister of Valentinian III (1)



Numismatica Ars Classica, Zurich   |   Auction 102   |   24 October 2017 Sort by Lot-NumberSort by Estimate
Online bidding ends:  24 October 2017 10:00 CEST

<< Previous lot Next lot >>
Lot 585





Estimate: 25'000 CHF   |   Starting price: 20'000 CHF
CHF  
Solidus, Nicomedia 324-325, AV 4.43 g. FL IVL CRIS – PVS NOB CAES Laureate heroic bust l., holding spear pointing forward and shield on l. arm. Rev. VIRTVS – CAESARI N Crispus galloping r., holding shield on l. arm and charging with spear at kneeling enemy; below horse, a slain soldier with shield. In exergue, SMNM. C 164 var. RIC 84. Alföldi 679 var. (officina K). Depeyrot 35/6.
Very rare and in exceptional condition for the issue. A gentle portrait,
the work of a skilled engraver, good extremely fine
Ex NAC sale 51, 2009, 430.
The execution of Crispus in 326 was a watershed moment in the reign of Constantine the Great: not only did he lose his eldest son (at the time his only realistic heir since his other three sons were merely boys), but in the aftermath he also executed his wife Fausta for what he thought to be her leading role in a grand deception. However, if we dig deeper into the historical record, another possibility for Crispus’ execution emerges. In 326 Constantine was at, or was approaching, his 20th anniversary, depending on whether he counted 306 or 307 as his starting point as Augustus. There is reason to believe that, like Diocletian, Constantine had promised to abdicate after two decades of rule. His natural heir would have been Crispus, a popular young man approaching 30 years old and of proven ability. Some historians believe Constantine may have allowed the trial and execution of Crispus out of a desire – actual or subliminal – to remove him from contention for the throne. After all, his other sons were only 10 years old or younger, and if they were the only options as a replacement, Constantine would have to rule for at least another decade. Though the truth may never be known, it seems hard to believe that Crispus would have tried to seduce his stepmother, who was at least ten years his senior and was his father’s wife. Indeed, the seduction story reads more like a fictional, revisionist account, and the truth may lie in the more practical explanation.

Add to watch list    |   Search for similar lots    |   Share:  

Close